Courses

The English Department provides its undergraduates with a wide and engaging range of courses to choose from during the course of their academic career. From freshman composition to courses in creative writing, the study of English, American and World literatures, as well as advanced level seminars which provide a more in-depth look at subjects particular to a student's interest, the large number of course offerings taught by the Department's knowledgeable faculty most often leaves its students wanting to take more classes, rather than wanting for classes to take. For a description of available classes, please look to the menu below.

Detailed Descriptions: Fall 2011 / Spring 2012 / Summer 2012 / Fall 2012 / Spring 2013 / Summer 2013 / Fall 2013 / Spring 2014 / Summer 2014 / Fall 2014 / Spring 2015 / Summer 2015 / Fall 2015 / Spring 2016 / Summer 2016 / Fall 2016 / Spring 2017 / Summer 2017 / Fall 2017 / Spring 2018

We offer many sections of 100- and 200-level English courses every semester. Please consult the listings on myBama to see the schedules and availability of these courses.

100 | 200 | 300 | 400

100-level Courses

100 level courses are introductory composition courses reserved for freshmen. These courses cover critical thinking and reading, rhetorical techniques, and the conventions of academic writing in order to prepare students for writing at the college level. Students will write a variety of essays, from the personal to the analytical, and will learn by taking their work through the writing process of drafting, collaborating, and revising.

EN 099 Basic Writing. No credit awarded.

Fundamentals of expository writing. EN 099 is required for students who place into EN 101 but are judged, on the basis of an in-class expository writing assignment during the first week of class, to be insufficiently prepared for that course. A grade of “C-” or higher in EN 099 is required for eligibility to advance to EN 101. Students who do not earn grades of “C-” or higher in this course will be assigned grades of “NC” (“No Credit”).

EN101 English Composition I. Three hours.

Introduction to college-level expository writing, critical reading, and preliminary research techniques, and the rhetorical tools needed to participate successfully in the University of Alabama discourse community. Grades are reported as “A,” “B,” “C,” or “NC” (“No Credit”). A grade of “C-” or higher is required as a prerequisite for advancing to another English course at The University of Alabama. Offered each semester and in summer school. EN 101 does not apply as credit to the English major or minor.

EN 102 English Composition II. Three hours.

Intermediate college-level expository writing covering the principles of formal argumentation, advanced critical thinking and analysis, university-level research techniques, and research-paper writing. Grades are reported as “A,” “B,” “C,” or “NC” (“No Credit”). A grade of “C-” or higher is required as a prerequisite for advancing to another English course at The University of Alabama. Offered each semester and in summer school. EN 102 does not apply as credit to the English major or minor.

Prerequisite: EN 101.

EN 103 Advanced English Composition. Three hours.

This is an accelerated freshman composition course that is open to students with minimum composite scores of 28 ACT or 1350 SAT, or minimum ACT English scores of 30 or SAT verbal scores of 730. With the appropriate qualifying scores and the completion of EN 103 with a grade of “C-“ or higher, placement credit is awarded for EN 101 and the general education requirement for freshman composition is completed. Expository writing. Topics to be determined by each instructor. Grades are reported as “A,” “B,” “C,” or “NC” (“No Credit”). A grade of “C-” is required as a prerequisite for advancing to another English course at The University of Alabama. EN 103 does not apply as credit to the English major or minor.

EN 104 Blount Freshman English. Three hours.

College-level expository writing, critical reading, and library research. Grades are reported as “A,” “B,” “C,” or “NC” (“No Credit”). This course substitutes for either EN 103 Advanced Composition or EN 101 Freshman Composition I. Students who qualify for EN 103 (a score of 28 or higher on the ACT or 1240 on the SAT) are awarded an additional 3 hours of composition credit with a grade of “pass” upon successful completion of EN 104. Other students receive the same credit if they earn a grade of “A-” or higher. Students who earn a grade lower than “A-” are required to take three additional hours of freshman composition, generally EN 102. Students who have credit for EN 101 and EN 102 either from another institution or through AP or IB placement do not take EN 104. EN 104 does not apply as credit to the English major or minor.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Blount Undergraduate Initiative.

EN 120 English Composition I for Non-Native Speakers. Three hours.

Emphasis on writing and conversation. Grades are reported as "A," "B," "C," or "NC" ("No Credit"). A grade of "C" is required as a prerequisite for advancing to another English course at The University of Alabama. Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance on the departmental examination for non-native speakers of English.

EN 121 English Composition II for Non-Native Speakers. Three hours applicable to English composition requirement.

Emphasis on writing and research papers. Grades are reported as "A," "B," "C," or "NC" ("No Credit"). A grade of "C" is required as a prerequisite for advancing to another English course at The University of Alabama. Prerequisite: EN 120.

Top of Page

200-level Courses

200 level courses introduce students to the literature of the world, focusing more heavily on English and American literature while offering an overview of literature from the many cultures of the world. At this level students interested in creative writing are also able to take the Department's introductory creative writing course.

EN 200 Introduction to Creative Writing. Three hours.

Study and practice in the writing of poetry and fiction. Prerequisites: EN 101 and EN 102 (or EN 103), or permission of the instructor.

EN 201 How English Works. Three hours.

This course will introduce students to the wide-ranging discipline of linguistics that incorporates aspects of both the humanities and the social sciences. Students will explore the elements from which languages are composed, examine differences across languages, and see how linguistic data and methods are brought to bear on real-world issues in the realms of psychology, literary studies, sociology, education, and the judicial system. Language will be presented as a constantly changing phenomenon that is embedded in culture and steeped in ideology.

Prerequisites: EN 101 and EN 102 (or EN 103).

EN 205 English Literature I. Three hours.

Survey of literature in English that begins with the Anglo-Saxon period and ends in 1800. Includes serious treatment of Chaucer, Shakespeare.

Prerequisites: EN 101 and EN 102 (or EN 103).

EN 206 English Literature II. Three hours.

Survey of English literature from 1800 to the present, including, for example, work by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Dickens, Eliot, and Yeats.

Prerequisites: EN 101 and EN 102 (or EN 103).

EN 207 World Literature I. (same as WL 207). Three hours.

Survey of world literature from the Classical period to the Renaissance.

Prerequisites: EN 101 and EN 102 (or EN 103).

EN 208 World Literature II. (same as WL 208). Three hours.

Survey of world literature from the Enlightenment to the Modern period.

Prerequisites: EN 101 and EN 102 (or EN 103).

EN 209 American Literature I. Three hours.

Survey of American literature from its beginnings to 1865, including work by Poe, Thoreau, Emerson, Melville, and Whitman.

Prerequisites: EN 101 and EN 102 (or EN 103).

EN 210 American Literature II. Three hours.

Survey of American literature from 1865 to the present, including works by Twain, Dickinson, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Morrison.

Prerequisites: EN 101 and EN 102 (or EN 103).

EN 215 Honors English Literature I. Three hours.

Honors sections of EN 205.

EN 216 Honors English Literature II. Three hours.

Honors sections of EN 206.

EN 219 Honors American Literature I. Three hours.

Honors sections of EN 209.

EN 220 Honors American Literature II. Three hours.

Honors sections of EN 210.

EN 249 African-American Literature. Three hours.

Survey of African-American literature from its earliest expressions to the present. In order to identify the aesthetics of the African-American literary tradition, the course material includes spirituals, slave narratives, poetry, drama, autobiography, fiction, and nonfiction.

Prerequisites: EN 101 and EN 102 (or EN 103).

Top of Page

300-level Courses

The Department of English views 300-level courses as "bedrock reading" and, except in the case of major author courses—such as Chaucer or Milton—they will normally cover a variety of authors. Although secondary sources may be employed, in most cases reading lists will be based on primary sources and will concentrate on the writers and forms that represent the core history of literature in England and/or America. Courses at this level are designed to provide appropriate continuity between broad sophomore surveys and more specialized 400-level courses. Prerequisite for 300-level courses: 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200 level.

EN 300 Introduction to English Studies. Three hours.

An introduction for English majors to the methods employed in the discipline of English. Students will be exposed to the fundamental issues of critical reading, interpretation, and writing, especially to the use of critical methods in the study of primary texts. Readings will include a selection of texts in the traditional categories of poetry, drama, and prose, as well as the genre of the critical essay. There may also be investigations into other genres and media.

EN 301 Fiction Writing. Three hours each semester.

Introductory workshop in fiction writing. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment is limited to 15.

Prerequisite: EN 200 or permission of the instructor.

EN 303 Poetry Writing. Three hours each semester.

Introductory workshop in poetry writing. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment is limited to 15.

Prerequisite: EN 200 or permission of the instructor.

EN 309 Advanced Expository Writing. Three hours.

English 309, an advanced writing workshop, aims to help student writers who want additional expository writing instruction after English 101 and 102. Class members will analyze their writing strengths and weaknesses, set goals for improving their writing and work on practical writing assignments depending partly on their majors or fields of interest. Students will study and practice advanced techniques of effective expository prose, including explanation, logic and persuasion, analysis, evaluation, and stylistic sophistication.

EN 310 Writing: Special Topics. Three hours.

Topics vary from semester to semester; examples are legal writing, writing about social sciences, and reading and writing in cyberspace.

EN 311 Literature: Special Topics. Three hours.

Topics vary from semester to semester and may include courses offered by other departments.

EN 317 Writing Center Practicum. Three hours.

This writing-intensive course prepares students to work as Writing Center consultants. Activities include readings, discussions, reflection/response/critical essays, role-playing, observations, and research. Students have the opportunity to work under supervision in the University of Alabama Writing Center. Students who successfully complete the course will be eligible to work on the UAWC staff in future semesters.

EN 319 Technical Writing. Three hours.

Focuses on principles and practices of technical writing, including audience analysis, organization and planning, information design and style, usability testing, and collaborative writing.  Special emphasis will be placed on composing instructions, various kinds of reporting such as investigative and feasibility studies, document design for technical presentations, proposals and collaborative composition.

Prerequisites: EN 101 and EN 102 (or equivalent) and junior standing.

EN 320 Introduction to Linguistics. Three hours.

Introduction to the study of language, including subjects such as language acquisition, variation, and origins. The system of sounds, syntax, and meaning are illustrated in English and other languages.

EN 321 Linguistic Approaches to English Grammar. Three hours.

A study of English grammar integrating principles from linguistic theory with structural approaches to grammar. The course includes a focus on the expectations of grammatical usage in different contexts and an understanding of how to apply this knowledge in a pedagogical setting.

EN 329 Directed Studies. One to three hours.

Prerequisite: Enrollment only by previous arrangement with a specific instructor and with the permission of the director of undergraduate English studies. Click here for the Directed Studies Proposal form.    

EN 330 Chaucer and Medieval Literature. Three hours.

Examines works of the Old and Middle English Periods, the formative years of British literature. Works from pre-conquest England may include Beowulf, Bede's History of the English Church, and poems from the Exeter and Vercelli manuscripts. The major works from the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries may include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, William Langland's Piers Plowman, John Gower's Confessio Amantis, and Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde and Canterbury Tales.

EN 331 Chaucer. Three hours.

Introduction to the works of Chaucer. This course includes a study of Chaucer's language as well as the fourteenth-century milieu.

EN 332 Sixteenth-Century Literature. Three hours.

A cross-genre survey of the literature of the Elizabethan period. Authors may include Sir Thomas More, Sir Thomas Wyatt, Sir Philip Sidney, Sir Walter Ralegh, Edmund Spenser, Aemilia Lanyer, Christopher Marlowe, and William Shakespeare.

EN 333 Shakespeare (previously EH 366). Three hours.

Introduction to Shakespeare's plays. Various aspects of Elizabethan life and customs; philosophy and politics; history and psychology are also examined as they relate to the drama.

EN 334 Seventeenth-Century Literature. Three hours.

A cross-genre survey of literature in English from 1603 to 1660. Authors may include John Donne, Ben Jonson, Francis Bacon, John Webster, Lady Mary Wroth, William Bradford, Anne Bradstreet, and Andrew Marvell.

EN 335 Milton. Three hours.

An introduction to Milton's English poetry and the complex history, politics, aesthetics, philosophy, and theology of seventeenth-century England. Typically devotes approximately half the semester to a close reading of Paradise Lost.

EN 340 American Literature to 1900. Three hours.

A cross-genre survey of American literature from its beginnings to 1900. Authors may include Mary Rowlandson, Cotton Mather, Phillis Wheatley, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Frederick Douglass, Henry James and Mark Twain.

EN 341 American Poetry to 1900. Three hours.

A survey of American poetry from its beginnings to 1900. Authors may include Anne Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, and Emily Dickinson.

EN 342 American Fiction to 1900. Three hours.

A survey of the development of American fiction from its beginnings to 1900, with attention to both the novel and short story. Authors may include James Fenimore Cooper, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Herman Melville, Mark Twain, and Kate Chopin.

EN 343 British Fiction to 1900. Three hours.

A survey of developments in British fiction from its beginnings to 1900. Authors may include Aphra Behn, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Fanny Burney, Charles Dickens, and George Eliot.

EN 344 Major Authors, 1660-1900. Three hours.

Limited to a maximum of three authors. Attention to the national literatures of Britain and America, and to different genres of prose, drama, and poetry, will vary from semester to semester. Authors may include Alexander Pope, Jane Austen, Thomas De Quincey, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Frederick Douglass, and Emily Dickinson.

EN 345 Nonfiction in English, 1660-1900. Three hours.

A survey of essays and non-fiction prose by major British and American writers as they deal with a wide range of social and literary problems that arose in an increasingly scientific, democratic, and industrial age. Authors may include John Dryden, Mary Wollstonecraft, Walter Pater, Thomas Jefferson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Olaudah Equiano, and Harriet Jacobs.

EN 346 Drama, 1660-1900. Three hours.

A survey of British, American, and European drama and theatrical issues during the period that extends from Moliere, John Dryden, and Aphra Behn to Henrik Ibsen and Bernard Shaw.

EN 347 English Literature During the Enlightenment. Three hours.

A cross-genre survey of English literature during the period 1660-1800. Authors may include John Locke, John Bunyan, Mary Astell, Jonathan Swift, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, and Samuel Johnson.

EN 348 Romantic Literature. Three hours.

A cross-genre survey of British Romantic writers such as William Blake, Jane Austen, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lord Byron, John Keats, and Percy Bysshe and Mary Shelley.

EN 349 Victorian Literature. Three hours.

A survey of the genres, authors, and issues in British literature, 1832-1900. Authors may include Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Christina Rossetti, and Oscar Wilde.

EN 350 Topics in African-American Literature

A cross-genre survey of African-American literature, historical events and critical movements. Authors may include Frederick Douglas, Harriet Jacobs, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larson, Langston Hughes, Toni Morrison.

EN 360 Topics in American Literature, 1900-1945. Three hours.

A cross-genre survey of major literary figures, critical movements, historical events, and significant texts within the first half of the twentieth century in America. Authors may include Henry James, Edith Wharton, W.E.B. Du Bois, Gertrude Stein, Countee Cullen, Eugene O'Neill, and Wallace Stevens.

EN 361 Topics in American Literature, 1945 to Present. Three hours.

A cross-genre survey of major literary figures, critical movements, historical events, and significant texts since the Second World War in America. Authors may include Langston Hughes, Arthur Miller, James Baldwin, Norman Mailer, Toni Morrison, Sam Shepherd, Adrienne Rich, and John Ashbery.

EN 362 Topics in British Literature, 1900 to 1945. Three hours.

A cross-genre survey of major literary figures, critical movements, historical events, and significant texts within the first half of the twentieth century in Britain. Authors may include Joseph Conrad, Bernard Shaw, W.B. Yeats, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Katherine Mansfield, and T.S. Eliot.

EN 363 Topics in British Literature, 1945 to Present. Three hours.

A cross-genre survey of major literary figures, critical movements, historical events, and significant texts since the Second World War in England. Authors may include Samuel Beckett, W.H. Auden, Doris Lessing, Seamus Heaney, Harold Pinter, and Jeanette Winterson.

EN 364 Modern Drama. Three hours.

A survey of the major American, British, European, and African plays from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Authors may include Eugene O'Neill, Tennessee Williams, Ntozake Shange, Oscar Wilde, Harold Pinter, Tom Stoppard, August Strindberg, Anton Chekhov, Wole Soyinka, and Athol Fugard.

EN 365 Modern American Fiction. Three hours.

A survey of American fiction—novels and short stories—written in the twentieth century. Authors may include F. Scott Fitzgerald, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, Toni Morrison, N. Scott Momaday, and Leslie Marmon Silko.

EN 366 Twentieth-Century Poetry. Three hours.

A survey of major authors and trends in modern poetry in America, Britain, and the anglophone world, as poetry in English became an international phenomenon. Attention will be paid to modernist and post-modernist poetry movements, American regionalisms, war poetry, and the poetry of neo-colonial experiences.

EN 367 Post-Colonial Writing in English. Three hours.

A survey of the history, culture, and literature of the Caribbean, Africa, and India. Authors may include V.S. Naipaul, Jamaica Kincaid, Michelle Cliff, Bessie Head, Chinua Achebe, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Bharati Mukherjee, and Salman Rushdie.

EN 368 Modern British Fiction. Three hours.

A survey of the twentieth-century novels and short stories produced by leading British and Irish writers. Authors may include James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, Iris Murdoch, A.S. Byatt, and Martin Amis.

EN 370 Comedy. Three hours.

A cross-genre survey of comic literature that may begin with classical models and proceed through the present. This course, like comedy itself, will focus on people as social beings, especially on the relation between the sexes. Sub-genres explored may include fabliaux or folk humor, romantic comedy, city comedy, black humor, and theatre of the absurd.

EN 371 Tragedy. Three hours.

A cross-genre survey of tragic literature that may begin with the classical tragedians and proceed through the present. This course, like tragedy itself, will focus on the individual confronting the larger forces of society, god, or fate. Applying the concept of tragedy to fiction and poetry as well as to drama, this course will consider changing conceptions of the tragic and the tragic hero.

EN 372 Popular Literature. Three hours.

A study of material recovered from oral tradition from the late Middle Ages to the present. The focus of the course may be ballads or songs, tales or riddles, etc. If "popular" is construed as "low-brow" rather than "folk," the course may be designed to consider such topics as broadside ballads, fiction before the novel, or best sellers of the twentieth century.

EN 373 Women in Literature. Three hours.

A survey of British and American literature written by and/or about women. Authors may include a cross-genre range from Anne Bradstreet and Fanny Burney to Toni Morrison and Louise Erdrich.

EN 399 Honors Seminar in English. Three hours.

Covers selected topics in English that vary from year to year. Topics are most likely to be thematic and to cut across conventional divisions of literary period and literary form. Required for departmental honors.

Prerequisites: EN 215 and EN 216 (or EN 219 or EN 220).

Top of Page

400-level Courses

The Department of English distinguishes 400-level courses from 300-level courses by the attention given at the 400 level to both specialization of focus and critical method(s). The 400-level courses will focus on both the literature and the way we study literature, so primary texts will be taught in conjunction with secondary and/or critical sources. All 400-level English courses, except EN 403, EN 405, EN 406, and EN 430, are designed by the department to comply with the standards upheld by the core curriculum writing (W) designation, which indicates that one of the conditions for a passing grade is that students write coherent, logical, and carefully edited prose in a minimum of two papers, at least one of which will be graded and returned before midsemester. Prerequisite for 400-level courses: 18 hours of English, including 6 hours at the 200 level and 6 hours at the 300 level.

EN 400 Senior Seminar. Three hours.

Designed to provide advanced undergraduates with a small-section, participatory, rigorous course that demands both the use of critical sources and the writing of a long paper. The department views these seminars as graduate courses for undergraduates. Topics will vary from semester to semester. A student may take only one senior seminar. Prerequisites: Twenty four hours toward the English major.

EN 408 Advanced Creative Writing. Three hours.

Special topics in imaginative writing. Focus may be on poetry, fiction, non fiction or a combination. Students produce imaginative writing and read related texts.

Prerequisites: EN 200 and EN 301 and EN 303.

EN 409 Writing For Film. Three hours.

Introduction to the craft of writing for film and television.

EN 410 Writing Professional Non-Fiction. Three hours.

Study of imaginative prose engaged with factual subject matter. Reading of published creative nonfiction and assigned writing experiments will complement round table discussion and criticism of original student manuscripts.

EN 411 Advanced Studies in Comparative or Multicultural Literature. Three hours.

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topics course that focuses on issues involving comparative literatures and/or cultural studies.

EN 422 Advanced Studies in American Literature. Three hours.

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topics course that focuses on issues in American literature.

EN 423 History Of English. Three hours.

EN 424 Structure of English. Three hours.

Designed for advanced English majors, this course examines the structure and usage of the English language including morphology (word formation/structure), syntax (the patterns of sentences), and discourse (the context in which utterances are patterned and made meaningful).

EN 425 Variation in American English. Three hours.

The study of the experience of the English language in America with particular emphasis on its development and dialects.

Prerequisites: EN 320 and EN 321.

EN 429 Directed Studies. One to three hours.

Prerequisite: Enrollment only by previous arrangement with a specific instructor and with the permission of the director of undergraduate English studies. Click here for the Directed Studies Proposal form.

EN 430 English Internship. Three hours.

An on- or off-campus training position in which students use the skills they have gained as English majors and enhance their employment opportunities after graduation. Interns work approximately 10 hours a week, holding responsible positions with, among others, Alabama Heritage, Alabama Alumni Magazine, and the Tuscaloosa Public Defender's Office. Applications for the Enlish Internship should be submitted to the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of English. Prerequisites: English major, 3.00 grade point average, and second-semester junior or senior standing in the semester in which the internship is held. EN 430 does not count towards the 400-level major electives.  Click here for the English Internship Proposal form.

Credit for the internship is not applicable toward the minimum 36 hours required in the English major but may be counted as elective hours.

EN 433 Advanced Studies in British Literature. Three hours.

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topic course that focuses on issues in British literature.

EN 444 Advanced Studies in Literary Criticism and Theory. Three hours.

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topics course that focuses on issues involving literary criticism and critical theory.

EN 455 Advanced Studies in Writing. Three hours.

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topics course that focuses on the process of writing. The forms this writing may take include, but are not limited to, film, creative non-fiction, autobiography, and local color.

EN 456 Writing Center Theory and Research. Three hours.

This course augments the professional practice of Writing Center staff through readings, writing assignments, and discussions. Theory will be heavily emphasized. One major research paper. Please note that no more than three credit hours of any Writing Center coursework will count toward an English major or minor.

EN 466 Advanced Studies in Linguistics. Three hours.

Designed for English majors, a special topics course that focuses on issues in linguistics.

EN 477 Advanced Studies in Literary Genre. Three hours.

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topics course that focuses on issues in genre criticism.

EN 488 Advanced Studies in African-American Literature. Three hours.

Designed for the advanced English major, a special topics course that focuses on issues in African-American literature.

EN 499 Honors Seminar in Literature. Three hours.

Open only to students in the Honors Program in English. Enrollment is limited to 12.

Top of Page