Undergraduate Program

Undergraduate Courses 2018-2019

 

Summer 2018 | Fall 2018 | Spring 2019

Summer 2018

Interim

EN 311-001: Special Topics in Literature

Sasser
MTWRF 10:00-1:00

Seuss, Sendak, an Shel
This course explores the life and work of the three most popular and critically celebrated American children’s literature authors: Theodore “Dr. Seuss” Geisel, Maurice Sendak, and Shel Silverstein. Far from being sentimental purveyors of cute and innocent children’s books, these authors are politically driven, subversive, and at times even radical. Thus, we will address three major questions surrounding these authors: 1) What specific aspects of mid-twentieth century American culture created them? 2) How have publishers and estate holders worked to sentimentalize these authors, and what effects has that sentimentalization had on the construction of American childhood? and 3) How does a critical understanding of the written and visual aesthetics of these authors fundamentally challenge how readers generally have received these popular texts? Indeed, this interim semester, in the words of Maurice Sendak, is going to be “wild rumpus.”

EN 311-002: Special Topics in Literature

Hodo
MTWRF 9:00-12:00

Use Your Little Grey Cells: Examining the Detective in Print and on the Screen
Since its inception in the 1800s, detective fiction has captivated the minds of readers. From Poe’s Dupin to Christie’s Poirot to the many incarnations of Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes, readers find themselves drawn into richly woven mysteries where they can attempt to solve the crime alongside their fictional counterparts. This course will explore the characteristics of the detective fiction genre. We will discuss the changing values, attitudes, and portrayals of the detective and their roles in the justice system. We will read a variety of novels and short stories bridging the different eras of the genre (beginnings/Victorian, the Golden Age, Noir, and Modern). There will also be in class viewings of selected episodes from various television series and films such as Double Indemnity, The Mirror Crack’d, CSI and more.

Term I

EN 319-050: Technical Writing

Dayton
MTWRF 10:00-11:45

Focuses on principles and practices of technical writing, including audience analysis, organization and planning, information design and style, usability testing, and collaborative writing. Special emphasis will be placed on composing instructions, various kinds of reporting such as investigative and feasibility studies, document design for technical presentations, proposals and collaborative composition.

EN 329-050: Directed Studies

Prerequisite: Enrollment only by previous arrangement with a specific instructor and with the permission of the director of undergraduate English studies.

EN 408-050: Adv. Creative Writing

Staples
MTWRF 10:00-11:45

Image and Word
This course will adventure into the territories where the image and the word meet. Our course texts and prompts will include graphic novels; illuminated manuscripts; ekphrastic writings in response to photographs, paintings, and sculpture; poetry comics; emoji poetry; visual poetry; maps—wherein the eyes, ears, and hands work together to, as Blake has it, “cleanse the d☺☺rs ☺f percepti☺n.” Readings will include Songs of Innocence and Experience, William Blake; My Name is Red, Orhan Pamuk; I Parrot, Deb Olin Unferth; Let Us Know Praise Famous Men, James Agee and others.
Prerequisites: EN 200 and EN 301 and EN 303.

EN 429-050: Directed Readings

Prerequisite: Enrollment only by previous arrangement with a specific instructor and with the permission of the director of undergraduate English studies.

Term II

EN 319-100: Technical Writing

Buck
MTWRF 10:00-11:45

Focuses on principles and practices of technical writing, including audience analysis, organization and planning, information design and style, usability testing, and collaborative writing. Special emphasis will be placed on composing instructions, various kinds of reporting such as investigative and feasibility studies, document design for technical presentations, proposals and collaborative composition.

EN 329-100: Directed Studies

Prerequisite: Enrollment only by previous arrangement with a specific instructor and with the permission of the director of undergraduate English studies.

EN 333-100: Shakespeare

Koester
MTWRF 2:00-3:45

This course is a broad introduction to Shakespearean drama, and places primary emphasis on language: most of our time and energy in this course will be devoted to the analysis and interpretation of Shakespeare’s words, and to an appreciation of their pleasures and complexities.

EN 429-100: Directed Readings

Prerequisite: Enrollment only by previous arrangement with a specific instructor and with the permission of the director of undergraduate English studies.
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Study Abroad

EN 311-800: Special Topics in Literature

Parker
Study Abroad – New Zealand

Topics vary from semester to semester and may include courses offered by other departments.

EN 311-801: Special Topics in Literature

McNaughton
Study Abroad – Ireland

Topics vary from semester to semester and may include courses offered by other departments.

EN 311-802: Special Topics in Literature

Iheka
Study Abroad – South Africa

Topics vary from semester to semester and may include courses offered by other departments.

EN 311-803: Special Topics in Literature

Sasser
Study Abroad – Italy

Topics vary from semester to semester and may include courses offered by other departments.

EN 311-804: Special Topics in Literature

Selesky
Study Abroad – Oxford

Topics vary from semester to semester and may include courses offered by other departments.

EN 329-800: Directed Studies

Parker
Study Abroad – New Zealand

Prerequisite: Enrollment only by previous arrangement with a specific instructor and with the permission of the director of undergraduate English studies.

EN 333-800: Shakespeare

Sasser
Study Abroad – Italy

Introduction to Shakespeare’s plays. Various aspects of Elizabethan life and customs; philosophy and politics; history and psychology are also examined as they relate to the drama.

EN 362-800: Topics in British Literature, 1900-1945

McNaughton
Study Abroad – Ireland

A cross-genre survey of major literary figures, critical movements, historical events, and significant texts within the first half of the twentieth century in Britain. Authors may include Joseph Conrad, Bernard Shaw, W.B. Yeats, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Katherine Mansfield, and T.S. Eliot.

EN 408-800: Adv. Creative Writing

McNaughton
Study Abroad – Ireland

Special topics in imaginative writing. Focus may be on poetry, fiction, non-fiction or a combination. Students produce imaginative writing and read related texts.
Prerequisites: EN 200 and EN 301 and EN 303.

EN 411-800: Adv. Studies in Multi-Cultural Literature

Iheka
Study Abroad – South Africa

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topics course that focuses on issues involving comparative literatures and/or cultural studies.

EN 429-800: Directed Readings

Iheka
Study Abroad – South Africa

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topics course that focuses on issues involving comparative literatures and/or cultural studies.

EN 433-800: Adv. Studies in British Literature

McNaughton
Study Abroad- Ireland

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topics course that focuses on issues in British literature.

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Fall 2018

Literature, Pre-1700

EN 332-001: Sixteenth-Century Literature

Ainsworth
TR 2:00-3:15

This course will introduce you to the poetry and prose of the English Renaissance. We will begin with an intensive study of the Elizabethan sonnet, looking at poets including Wyatt, Sidney, Marlowe, Spenser, and Shakespeare. We will spend a substantial portion of the semester reading several books of Spenser’s Faerie Queen. We will also look at segments of several prose works from the period, including Sidney’s Defense of Poesy.

EN 333-001: Shakespeare

Loper
TR 11:00-12:15

This course offers an introduction to the study of Shakespeare’s plays. In addition to reading at least one play from each genre-comedy, tragedy, history, and romance-we will examine the material and cultural conditions of Shakespeare’s England. Students will be asked to consider the ways in which Shakespeare adapted sources for his audiences and, by viewing various film clips, will analyze how contemporary filmmakers adapt Shakespeare. Other topics of conversation will include the authorship debate, various critical approaches to interpreting Shakespeare’s plays, and some reasons for his lasting legacy.

EN 333-002: Shakespeare

Sasser
MW 3:00-4:15

We will be examining why Shakespeare occupies his place at the center of the literary canon. We will begin with Shakespeare’s accomplishments as a poet, both narrative and lyric. We will then move on to his accomplishments in the drama, examining what he did in four categories: comedy, tragedy, history, and romance.

Literature, 1700-1900

EN 340-001: American Literature to 1900

Beidler
TR 8:00-9:15

Early American Poetry
A study of the role and function of the poet in the Colonial, Revolutionary, and Early National eras. Figures include Sandys, Bradstreet, Wigglesworth, Taylor, Cooke, Wheatley, Barlow, Freneau, Bryant, Longfellow, Sigourney, Whitman, Dickinson. Midterm and final exams will test knowledge of key texts, concepts, titles, and terms. Out-of-class assignments will include two short critical papers.

EN 343-001: British Fiction to 1900

Weiss
MW 3:00-4:15

Orphans and Outcasts in the British Novel
The novel emerged and then flourished in England in a time of great social and economic change: the aristocracy was declining, the middle and professional classes were rising, and the value placed on inherited privilege and wealth were being replaced by a new respect for individual merit and upward mobility. Between 1700 and 1900, the British novel was centrally preoccupied with this shift–with documenting, examining, and evaluating the long, slow death of the aristocracy and its replacement by the rising middle class. A central character in the social and economic story the British novel told was the orphan—boy or girl—who had to make his or her way in the world without money, family, or status. Because of their parentless condition, these characters were often outcasts who had to move through life with little assistance or sympathy, often victims of a social environment filled with perils. The class will look at the development of the British novel through the experiences of orphans and outcasts, paying attention to formal elements such as characterization, setting, chronology, dialogue, and narration, as well as to the social and economic experiences of the various protagonists.

EN 348-001: Romantic Literature

Tedeschi
TR 11:00-12:15

This course provides a survey of literature written during the British Romantic period (roughly 1789-1832), a period marked by intense political turmoil, rapid social change, and an evolving literary field. The course considers literature in several genres, including poetry, the novel, and nonfiction prose; introduces many of the period’s most influential authors, including Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Byron, Mary and Percy Shelley, and Keats; and provides an introduction to the social, political, and intellectual history of the Romantic period.

EN 349-001: Victorian Literature

Novak
TR 9:30-10:45

Gender equality, racial justice, income inequality, religion, or the crisis in the humanities. These could be today’s top stories in your Newsfeed. But the discussion about these issues began back in the Victorian period, and in many ways we are still arguing about these questions on the very terms and values set by Victorian writers. In essays, novels, and poetry Victorian writers debated the position of women in the public sphere (“the Woman Question”), economic inequality and alienated labor (“The Condition of England Question”), English treatment of colonized subjects, evolution, religious skepticism, and the function of literature. Authors may include George Eliot, Charles Dickens, John Ruskin, Charlotte Bronte, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Robert Browning, Thomas Carlyle, Christina Rossetti, Oscar Wilde, and others.

Literature, Post-1900

EN 350-001/AAST 350-001: Topics in African-American Literature

Manora
MW 3:00-4:15

20th & 21st Century African American Women’s Literature
This course is a multi-genre study of works by African American women writers in the 20th and 21st centuries. As we move through the tradition, from Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance through the Black Arts Movement to the Contemporary and Postmodern periods, we will focus on issues related to narrative, identity, and subjectivity, as well as the intersections of race, class, and gender, while also considering these works within the context of critical discourses in social, cultural, and literary history. Authors will include Larsen, Hurston, Morrison, Walker, and Naylor. Requirements include active and engaged presence and participation, regular reader responses, one 4-5 page paper, a midterm, and a final paper.

EN 366-001: Twentieth-Century Poetry

White
TR 12:30-1:45

In this course we will read a selection of the most important American and British poets of the twentieth century. The purpose of this course is twofold: first, students will become familiar with poets and poems that have been particularly influential in contemporary poetry. This familiarity will be tested by exams that the class will help to structure. Second, and more importantly, the course will focus on ways to help students understand and articulate their thoughts about complex poetry. To this end, students will write two papers.

EN 367-001: Post-Colonial Writing in English

Iheka
TR 11:00-12:15

The 20th century was marked by the colonial condition which not only altered the invading countries but also the colonized societies disrupted as a consequence of forced contact. Postcolonial literature then is a genre/rubric that accounts for the ensemble of texts that colonized people have produced to articulate their subjectivities, illuminate vectors of colonial oppression, and to demonstrate the manner in which neocolonial forms of exploitation characterize the contemporary age. Focusing on texts from Africa, a continent significantly impacted by the colonial encounter, this course tracks the responses to the colonial moment in literature as well as the strategies African writers employ as they grapple with post-independence realities in their societies. Class readings will draw from the various regions of Sub-Saharan Africa in order to reflect the diversity and complexity of the continent. We will read the works of Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Adichie, Mariama Ba, NoViolet Bulawayo, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, among others.

EN 371-001: Tragedy

Deutsch
TR 2:00-3:15

What is tragedy? How does society deal with large-scale catastrophes of a political, religious, idealistic, or organic nature? By giving up? By forging on? What makes a tragic hero or heroine? What is the relationship between tragedy and comedy? These are some of the issues we’ll examine as we look at how an individual or a small group confronts the hostile forces of gods, fates, or even simply social conventions. After examining the classical dramatic tradition, we’ll swiftly move on to tragedies in the American tradition. For this, we’ll take a look at plays that have shaped the American tragic landscape and apply the concept of tragedy to modern American fiction and poetry. For help, we’ll turn to influential definitions and theories of tragedy, particularly those of Hegel, Nietzsche, and Miller.

EN 373-001: Women in Literature

Wittman
TR 12:30-1:45

In this course we will survey novels, short fiction, and prose non-fiction by women writing about the margins of society. Topics will include sexuality, race, mental illness, discrimination, violence, prostitution, and liberation. We will consider works by both British and American writers. Readings may include Virginia Woolf, Jean Rhys, Katherine Mansfield, Anaïs Nin, Patricia Highsmith, Carson McCullers, Flannery O’Conner, Joan Didion, Doris Lessing, Anne Carson, and Zadie Smith.

Creative Writing

EN 301-001 through 004: Fiction Tour

Various Staff

Close study of the basic principles for composing creative prose. Reading and assigned writing experiments in a broad range of prose strategies. Required of all creative writing minors.
Prerequisite: EN 200 (This prerequisite is never waived).

EN 303-001 through 004: Poetry Tour

Various Staff

Close study of basic principles for composing poetry. Reading and assigned writing experiments in a broad range of poetic styles. Required of all creative writing minors.
Prerequisite: EN 200 (This prerequisite is never waived).

EN 303-002: Poetry Tour

N. Parker
TR 2:00-3:15

Close study of basic principles for composing poetry. Reading and assigned writing experiments in a broad range of poetic styles. Required of all creative writing minors.
Prerequisite: EN 200 (This prerequisite is never waived).

EN 307-001: Special Topics in Applied Creative Writing

Albano
MW 3:00-4:15

Literary Editing and Publishing
This course is an exploration of the field of literary publishing and its professional practices. We will examine the origins, evolution, and the present-day landscape of literary journals and small presses, and learn the fundamentals of the editing process, from the acquisition and revision of work through its proofreading and publishing. We will discuss and implement strategies for publishing our own work covering the entire submission process, from identifying suitable journals to writing professional cover letters. As a culminating project we will make our own limited-run chapbook, which in addition to the aforementioned skills will introduce the basics of layout, design, and binding while considering essential post-publishing efforts such as distribution and marketing.

EN 307-002: Special Topics in Applied Creative Writing

Donaldson
MW 4:30-5:45

Creative Writing for Digital Media
This course will explore digital storytelling from a hands-on point of view. We will cover the emerging field of digital media—including but not limited to electronic literature, hypertext, and multimedia forms of storytelling—and learn to use a range of digital tools, including basic coding skills. The ability to tell a story—and tell it well—is essential to success in almost any career field, but particularly in the creative arts, publishing, marketing, PR, advertising, and business. Suitable for those who know absolutely nothing about the subject and who are looking to add marketable skills to their resumés as well as those who have some experience.

EN 307-003: Special Topics in Applied Creative Writing

Frank
TR 3:30-4:45

Writers in the Schools
In this class you learn best practices for curriculum design and instruction for students of all ages, elementary through high school. Develop your teaching skills, generate fun and innovative lesson plans, and gain practical experience volunteering at one of our WITS onsite programs providing after-school and in-school co-curricular enrichment. Ideal for students considering careers in teaching and arts nonprofits or simply interested in community and youth engagement.

Linguistics

EN 320-001: Introduction to Linguistics

Popova
TR 9:30-10:45

Introduction to the study of language, including subjects such as language acquisition, variation, and origins. The system of sounds, syntax, and meaning are illustrated in English and other languages.

EN 321-001: Linguistic Approaches to Grammar

Worden
TR 2:00-3:15

A study of English grammar integrating principles from linguistic theory with structural approaches to grammar. The course includes a focus on the expectations of grammatical usage in different contexts and an understanding of how to apply this knowledge in a pedagogical setting. This course is a prerequisite for EN 423, EN 424, EN 425, EN 466.

Methodology

EN 300-001: Introduction to English Studies

Pionke
TR 11:00-12:15

Designed primarily for English majors, especially for those at the early stages of fulfilling the major requirements, this course seeks to acquaint you with the tools, techniques and critical attitude necessary for in-depth literary study. Students majoring in other disciplines are also welcome, of course, and will find their reading, writing and analytical skills enhanced as a result. Our collective approach to the study of literature will focus on close, rather than voluminous, reading and careful analysis in the form of papers and others writing assignments. We will touch on research techniques and the varieties of literary criticism, but will concentrate most of our attention on mastering the vocabulary and techniques of textual analysis. Lest all this sounds frighteningly intimidating or, worse yet, frightfully boring, rest assured that we shall set our shoulders to an attractive wheel indeed, and that our time in and out of the classroom will be spent reading and discussing stories, poems and plays chosen both to instruct and to delight.

EN 300-002: Introduction to English Studies

Cardon
TR 2:00-3:15

You’ve perhaps read The Great Gatsby, but how would you teach it? Why, do you think, is it so important that nearly every high school requires its students to read it? What do we do with famous works of literature? Why does literature even matter in the Real World? EN 300 is designed primarily for English majors, but also for anyone interested in literary analysis. This class aims to

  • Provide an introduction to methods employed in our discipline for in-depth literary study;
  • Enrich skills in critical reading, writing, and analysis;
  • Introduce a range of critical and theoretical approaches to primary texts;
  • Help students to identify which of these approaches fits their style, their interests, and the nuances of a particular literary work;
  • Enhance students’ ability to close read texts in the form of papers and other assignments;
  • Teach the vocabulary, techniques, and research methods associated with literary analysis.

To become more adept at reading and interpreting literary texts, students will begin the course by revisiting a canonical work of literature (F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby) and learning about different methods for approaching, analyzing, and writing. From there, students will learn to apply these critical methods to other genres, including poetry, drama, and other texts and media.

Rhetoric and Composition

EN 309-001: Advanced Expository Writing

McKnight
TR 12:30-1:45

English 309, an advanced writing workshop, aims to help student writers who want additional expository writing instruction after English 101 and 102. Class members will analyze their writing strengths and weaknesses, set goals for improving their writing and work on practical writing assignments depending partly on their majors or fields of interest. Students will study and practice advanced techniques of effective expository prose, including explanation, logic and persuasion, analysis, evaluation, and stylistic sophistication.

EN 313-001: Writing Across Media

Branyon
MWF 1:00-1:50

Advanced writing course exploring composition with images, sound, video, and other media while considering theoretical perspectives on rhetorical concepts such as authorship, audience, process, revision, and design.

EN 319-001 through 006: Technical Writing

Various Staff

Focuses on principles and practices of technical writing, including audience analysis, organization and planning, information design and style, usability testing, and collaborative writing. Special emphasis will be placed on composing instructions, various kinds of reporting such as investigative and feasibility studies, document design for technical presentations, proposals and collaborative composition.
Prerequisites: EN 101 and EN 102 (or equivalent) and junior standing.

Directed Courses

EN 329-001 through 004: Directed Studies

Various Staff

Prerequisite: Enrollment only by previous arrangement with a specific instructor and with the permission of the director of undergraduate English studies.

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400-Level Courses

Advanced Studies in Literature

EN 411-001: Advanced Studies in Comparative/Multicultural Literature

Wittman
TR 2:00-3:15

In this course, we will read seven critically acclaimed novels from around the world and investigate how literature arrives on the global stage. This course is run as a literary prizegranting committee loosely based on the Nobel Prize committee. Every student is a committee member. In this course, it is the students themselves who come up with their own evaluative criteria. Throughout the semester we will then debate—in class and anonymously—the merits of the seven novels using these criteria. On the first day of class, students discuss what foreign language books they have read; on the last day, they debate and decide which of the novels should win the prize. This year we have the unique opportunity to spend classroom time with one of the award-winning writers.

EN 422-001: Advanced Studies in American Literature

Beidler
TR 9:30-10:45

Inventing American Modernism, 1865-1918
A study of the rise of American literary modernism between the American Civil War and The Great War—its post-1865 break with traditional social values and beliefs and with inherited forms of literary expression. We will address this in a number of ways: 1) partly as a response to parallel developments in Anglo-European modernist experimentalism in literature and the arts; 2) but also importantly as an independent reaction to particular late 19th and early 20th century developments in American life and culture; 3) and, finally, not only as an integral but perhaps even dominant force in 20th century transatlantic modernism at large. Writers studied will include Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Gilman, Crane, Chopin, Washington/du Bois, Pound/HD, and Eliot.

EN 422-002: Advanced Studies in American Literature

Crank
TR 12:30-1:45

Reading Katrina
Late in the August of 2005, the narrative of the city of New Orleans fundamental changed. Suddenly, with one storm, fantasies of the city’s vibrancy, and its space as tourist mecca were profoundly threatened, flooded, literally and physically, with black bodies, citizens of the city forced from their homes, killed, or rendered homeless, without shelter or food. Hurricane Katrina became a national problem revealing American anxieties over blackness, waste, reconstruction, migration, borders, and, perhaps most crucially, questions over authenticity: What does a rebuilding of an “authentic” New Orleans look like? Who belongs in this rebuilt city? Where will those citizens live in the city? How do we rebuild? Who are we rebuilding for? I don’t think it’s too much of a stretch to say that, for most of the second half of 2005, and for years to come, New Orleans, came to embody the anxieties most of the nation had about the South, its strangeness, its troubling histories, its ecological and economic ruination, its dogged binaries, and its blithely conservative politics completely tone deaf to its citizens. This course examines the cultural and literary discourses surrounding Hurricane Katrina as both an ecological/economic disaster and as a rhetoric for un/re/de-imagining the South in the early decades of the 21st century. We’re going to be looking at race, region, class, waste, global warming, issues of whiteness, media, political discourses, cultural references, and a fair number of films and texts including: SALVAGE THE BONES, LONG DIVISION, BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD, WHEN THE LEVEES BROKE, graphic novels like BEYOND KATRINA, AD: NEW ORLEANS AFTER THE DELUGE, and DARK WATER, as well as popular renderings of Katrina in the HBO series TREME, and the Beyonce video for FORMATION.

EN 433-001: Advanced Studies in British Literature

Cook
MW 3:00-4:15

The Romance, Then and Now
This course focuses on the origins and development of the romance genre. We will begin with medieval romances and then turn to novels of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth century. The aim of the course is to offer a historical perspective on this form of popular fiction. Medieval course readings will include selections from Marie de France’s Lais and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (in modern English translation). Novels will include Radcliffe’s The Romance of the Forest, Austen’s Northanger Abbey, Scott’s Ivanhoe, and Chesnutt’s The House Behind the Cedars.

EN 433-002: Advanced Studies in British Literature

Pionke
TR 2:00-3:15

This seminar will survey children’s literature in England from the seventeenth-century appearance of Mother Goose through the first “Golden Age” in the nineteenth century. Attentive to the constitutive tension between admonition/instruction on the one hand, and entertainment/wonder on the other, we will reconstruct the protean figure of the child (both gendered and not) who emerges as audience and subject of such texts as the imported fairy tales of Charles Perrault, the Grimm brothers and Hans Christian Anderson, and the domesticallyproduced Tom Brown’s Schooldays by Thomas Hughes and The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald. Demonstrating writing proficiency suitable for a senior-level seminar in English will be a required component of this university-designated “W” course.

EN 444-001/WS 410-001: Advanced Studies in Lit Criticism & Theory

Purvis
TR 2:00-3:15

“From Take Back the Night to Slutwalk: Sexual Justice across the Waves”
This course explores the ongoing and complicated relationship between sexual liberation and gender justice, with a focus on feminist responses to sexual violence and the emergence of a radical theory of sexual justice. It asks: What sort of sexual revolution is possible in the absence of gender justice? Longer Course Description: Despite the fact that issues concerning sexuality and bodily integrity are fraught with controversy and comprised of many competing views, feminist commitments to sexual liberation and gender justice persist. By comparing and contrasting challenges to sexual violence across the generations of feminism, this course emphasizes both continuity and points of departure between feminist agendas from the different waves, or generations, of feminisms—each committed to advancing sexual justice in its own way. Students in this course will gain an understanding of the issues surrounding sexual violence and rape culture, develop a working knowledge of the different feminist waves, or generations, and be able to trace feminist responses to sexual violence across the waves of feminism while actively breaking down divisions between these purportedly distinct waves. Students will assess artificial antagonisms, such as that between Sex Positive and Sex Negative Feminists and break down problematic terminology, such as “Sex Wars.” This course will establish an understanding of “sex-positive feminism” and “sexual justice” and provide a strong background for further study/praxis, including some of the rudiments of feminist theory.
Prerequisites: For WS 430: WS 200: “Introduction to Women’s Studies” (or equivalent) or permission of the professor. For EN 444: 18 hours of English Study, including 6 hours at the 200 level and 6 hours at the 300 level. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Advanced Studies in Writing

EN 455-001: Advanced Studies in Writing

Cardon
TR 11:00-12:15

Global Foodways
Designed for advanced English majors, EN 455 is a special topics course that focuses on the process of writing. Our topic this semester is Global Foodways. The discussions and assignments are framed around the following questions: How do local foodways become a cuisine? Why, when we visit a foreign country, do we find the cuisine so different from the version back home? How do social, geographical, economic, and political factors shape the way a cuisine develops over time? Each student will select a cuisine to research, explore, and write about over the course of the semester, meanwhile contributing to a Global Foodways class website. In addition, students will read, discuss, and analyze a series of texts about food. Most texts will be found in our supplemental reading folder on Blackboard, or Anthony Bourdain’s collection Medium Raw; we will also read Jean Hegland’s Into the Forest, as well as additional materials.

EN 455-002: Advanced Studies in Writing

Presnall
MW 3:00-4:15

The focus of this course is Michel de Montaigne and the Essay. We will discuss the life of Montaigne, his method, the reception of his Essays since first published in 1580, and Montaigne’s influence on major writers, including Shakespeare. We will also practice his method of writing from life to understand our own minds and finish by writing an essay after his style.

EN 455-003: Advanced Studies in Writing

Gardiner
TBA

Academic Integrity ELO
This course offers students an authentic Experiential Learning Opportunity. Working with the A & S Academic Integrity Initiatives Coordinator and the CCS Innovation Team, students will research, develop, write, and edit multimodal scripts, example paragraphs, source-based academic-writing lessons, assessments, and other teaching materials for a multi-unit online Academic Integrity module to be used by incoming UA students in future semesters. Course readings will include James Lang’s Cheating Lessons and articles on plagiarism and other academic integrity issues. In addition to real-life writing responsibilities, the course will also include reflective writing.

Creative Writing

EN 408-001: Advanced Creative Writing

Wells
M 2:00-4:30

Advanced Fiction Workshop
This class is devoted to the reading, writing, and analysis of short fiction. You will build on the prose writing and workshopping skills you’ve developed in previous creative writing courses. You will produce original fiction of your own invention and design and will be expected to read and provide feedback that is both rigorous and generous on the work of your fellow fiction writers.
Prerequisites: EN 200 and EN 301 and EN 303

EN 408-002: Advanced Creative Writing

Estes
M 2:00-4:30

Short Forms/Short Books (Multi-Genre)
Short forms—prose poems, flash fictions, micro essays, any brief thing—may play well to abbreviated attention spans, and may well manifest the soul of wit, but they are defined more often than not by their playfulness, an unrestrained capacity for shapeshifting, for strangeness, for subterfuge and surprise. In this course we will risk life and limb to swim amidst shards, fragments, and splinters, a sea of beginnings without endings, of endings without beginnings, of all middles. We will proliferate by division and elaborate by subtraction. And yet there is “the maker’s rage for order,” as Wallace Stevens says, and so we shall craft some small number of our small texts toward the crafting of small books. Chapbooks—so named for the chapmen, or peddlers, who wandered from town to town selling sundry wares to the common people—were quickly made, cheaply bought, but yet for common folks in far flung provinces were the principle medium of cultural exchange. “For many years they carried the work of historians, poets, storytellers, fortune tellers, song writers, clergymen, politicians, biographers, jesters, etc, etc, to the people, and as such, they were useful, entertaining, and instructive, despite their crudeness and their frequent deviation from accuracy and good taste,” according to historian Harry Weiss. So whatever you write, out of that mess of texts you will collect and collate, shuffle and shape your rough-hewn stuff into something finished, worthy, and above all portable.
Prerequisites: EN 200 and EN 301 and EN 303

EN 408-003: Advanced Creative Writing

Coryell
MW 3:00-4:15

Novel Workshop (Two-Semester Sequence)
This is part one of a two semester course designed with the goal of completing a draft of a novel. In this class we will deconstruct the novel-writing process, and move from brainstorming ideas all the way to workshopping books-in-progress. No matter the genre you’re looking to write, you’ll find this course an invaluable aid to developing a new or existing project. We will read and discuss a couple of novels in order to help inspire the writing process, and discuss the many challenges of writing longform narrative and strategies for overcoming them. Workshops will occur throughout the semester and novel sections will be turned in regularly. The goal of this course is not to write a perfect, complete text, but rather to learn how to forgive yourself for bad sentences and to do a lot of writing. By the end of the first semester, the goal is to have a partial novel draft completed with a full draft completed by the end of the second semester. We will also talk briefly about the novel publication process.
Prerequisites: EN 200 and EN 301 and EN 303.

EN 408-004: Advanced Creative Writing

Oliu
TR 9:30-10:45

Video Game Writing
In less than fifty years, dating from Atari’s release of Pong in 1972, video games and video gaming have revolutionized media consumption in the 21st century and shape the ways we interact with technology in the digital age. From that simplistic table tennis game has arisen whole empires—World of Warcraft is built out of over 5 million lines of code—and a multibillion dollar industry. Video games not only draw stylistic elements from art, literature, and film, but have influenced those art forms in turn, pioneering entirely new forms of storytelling. Whether you are new to gaming or have logged thousands of hours in front of a computer or console, this course will guide you in the writing and designing of your own video game, with special attention to interactive, non-linear (choice-based, open world) narratives— concepts which can be applied in many writing scenarios. As part of studying the art of video games and gameplay, we will read about video games, write about video games, discuss video games, Skype with video game writers, and of course play many kinds of video games.
Prerequisites: EN 200 and EN 301 and EN 303

EN 408-005: Advanced Creative Writing

Rawlings
MW 3:00-4:15

Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing
Telling true stories, and in the process grappling with what “true” means and where meaning resides, can be a thrilling, daunting, and artistically complex act. We will spend this semester experimenting with, drafting, responding to, and revising various forms of creative nonfiction, from memoir to travel writing to profiles to personal/political essays. We will focus on the development of skills particular to these subgenres as well as principles germane to all nonfiction writing. Along the way, we will identify and discuss and practice many of the essential skills of creative writing in general. Studying the structures and techniques of published works will help you discover the most effective and compelling means by which to tell your own stories.
Prerequisites: EN 200 and EN 301 and EN 303

EN 408-006: Advanced Creative Writing

Park
TR 12:30-1:45

Documentary Poetics
Like documentary filmmakers, documentary poets employ primary sources (court transcripts, photographs, public records, diagrams, recordings, letters, footage, etc.) to enter (or reenter) traumatic events, to unearth a moment in history, and to even report on their realities. At best, documentary poets respond to, rearrange, embed, and even redact primary sources in order to shed light on the forgotten and the marginalized, working to reinvigorate the poem as a locale for social justice. At worst, a documentary poet can insensitively unbury an event for the purpose of producing content. At either end, the intersection of the document and the poem encourages us to reassess the formal possibilities of a poem (can a poem act as a productive vessel for reportage?) alongside the role of the poet (can a poet be, as Philip Metres posits, a “journalist, historian, [and] agitator”?). This semester, we will read the works of Muriel Rukeyser, C.D. Wright, Jake Adam York, Charles Reznikoff, Susan M. Schultz, Paisley Rekdal, and others in order to investigate how poets use documentary modalities to negotiate questions of truth, presentation, and representation. We will also research and develop our own chapbook-length projects in order to explore how our work can give a voice to the past and/or speak out to the present.
Prerequisites: EN 200 and EN 301 and EN 303

EN 408-007: Advanced Creative Writing

Wyatt
TR 2:00-3:15

Online Writing, Writing Online (Various Forms)
As technology and economics transform publishing, online writing has been one way that writers have disrupted, subverted, and revolutionized the industry, cultivating a whole new market of readers. As popular blogger Sufia Tippu writes, “Blogging is hard because of the grind required to stay interesting and relevant.” But it’s not just blogs—writers are also sharing poetry, fiction, and deeply moving essays through their own personal sites as well as online journals and magazines. For this course, we will read books that were born of blogs as well as the blogs that spawned them, such as those by Allie Brosh and Jenny Lawson. Students will develop their own personal style and focus by building their own blogs, but will also explore pieces of literature of many genres that are published online. Students will write pieces and begin the process of submitting to online journals and magazines. We will explore the idea of brevity in writing fiction, poetry, and non-fiction using Twitter, as well as discuss ways to build an author platform online, which might (for starters) include a personal website and an active social media presence.
Prerequisites: EN 200 and EN 301 and EN 303

EN 408-008: Advanced Creative Writing

L. Wilson
T 2:00-4:30

The Elegy (Poetry)
“It does many things. It distracts the poet, at least momentarily, from a state of exquisite grief,” Mary Jo Bang says of the elegy, one of the most ancient forms in the poetic tradition, which gave her fifth collection, written in the wake of her son’s death, its name. This form has evolved from mournful verses of Greco-Roman couplets that follow a strict, metered pattern to a more nebulous, all-encompassing term for the mode of writing imbued with complex amalgam of emotions come with loss. This course will focus on the evolution of the elegy form from the 20th-century modern era in the West, dating to Rainer Marie Rilke’s Duino Elegies, to the present day. We will examine critically this form’s masculinist roots and the ways women, people of color, and LGBTQ writers (Bang, Meg Day, Leslie Harrison, Rosebud-Ben Oni, Danez Smith, Mai Der Vang) have pushed the elegy’s boundaries of expressing lament for those lost, praise for the departed, and consolation for those left behind. We will discuss essays on the form by poets and critics alike, including those of Peter Sacks, Roland Barthes, Jacques Derrida, Fred Moten, Carl Phillips, and Melissa Zeiger. We will examine poets’ ways of interrogating the divine, questioning belief itself, and finding something (or someone) to live for amid staggering loss as we write through our own personal valence on grief.
Prerequisites: EN 200 and EN 301 and EN 303

EN 408-009: Advanced Creative Writing

Staples
TR 2:00-3:15

Creative Thesis and Capstone Seminar (Multi-Genre)
Author Michael Ondaatje describes writing books as “a case of inching ahead on each page and discovering what’s beyond in the darkness, beyond where you’re writing.” This course will support such courageous forays. Students will work both independently under the instructor’s supervision and in a collaborative peer workshop to produce an artist statement and extended literary work or collection in the genre(s) of their choice. In addition to common readings and individualized reading lists, we will explore literary culture and ideas, artist biography, and other works aimed at preparing students for the writing life. Admission is by application and priority will be given to seniors and students in the English Honors Program. Obtain a project application from the Director of Undergraduate Creative Writing (john.estes@ua.edu).
Prerequisites: EN 200 and EN 301 and EN 303

EN 408-010: Advanced Creative Writing

Field
T 3:00-5:00

Feature Film Writing (Screenplay)
Some say there are seven stories we tell over and over. Some say three. But then some say there is only one—the Hero’s Journey. It’s been around since the beginning of civilization and is deeply embedded in our DNA (one of the reasons for its power). When it comes to writing, you know more than you think your know –because you have been hearing stories about and living the hero’s journey since you were born. “Such stories are accurate models of the workings of the human mind, true maps of the psyche,” writes Christopher Vogler, author of the book we will use in class. Students will learn how to find a story that ignites their passion. They will learn three-act structure, what makes dialogue work, and character development (Hint: Don’t look around for a plot. It’s not out there. Plot is character in action). No matter what story you want to tell (romance, comedy, horror, drama), the Hero’s Journey can give you the keys to the kingdom. You will learn to pitch a story and how to find a good agent, but before any of that you must first write a good script, and this class is your first step in writing what will be your calling card.
Prerequisites: EN 200 and EN 301 and EN 303

Linguistics

EN 423-001/EN 523: History of English

Davies
TR 11:00-12:15

This course considers questions such as the following: Why does Southern English have to propose “y’all” for a plural “you”? And while we’re at it, what happened to “thou”? What’s the deal with the subjunctive? How did Scandinavian pronouns (they, their, them) creep into English? Why can’t we ask “Have you not heard?” without sounding weird? Since the momentous event in 1066 was called “the Norman Conquest,” why aren’t we speaking French instead of English? Who decided that we can’t say “Ain’t nothin’ like ‘em nowhere” in standardized English? What’s going on with, like, quotatives, “and he was like….!”? Why can’t everybody open their book? How is English being affected by globalization and the internet? The course is an introduction to the external history of the English language along with the study of the accompanying internal changes in structure. It begins by peering back through the mists of history by means of linguistic tools that allow us to reconstruct what the original language in our “family” was like. Then we will track changes in English through its close encounters with other languages (most notably the Celtic languages, Old Norse, and French), through attempts at standardization, through the effects of globalization, to its diverse contemporary forms. For English majors the course should provide a basis for understanding the evolution of English grammar, pronunciation, and spelling as a background for studying English literature. The course examines the development of English from two perspectives: its outer history (i.e., the sociohistorical, cultural, and political forces that have helped shape the language) and its inner history (the phonological, grammatical, and lexical changes that have taken place). In addition, it looks at some general principles of language change and relates them to specific developments in English. By the end of the course you should understand why the English language is the way it is and be able to predict how it may change.
Prerequisite(s): EN 320 or EN 321 or ANT 210 or ANT 401 or ANT 450 or FR 361 or IT 361 or SP 361.

EN 424-001/EN 424: Structure of English

Liu
TR 12:30-1:45

This advanced grammar course examines the structure and usage of the English language, including morphology (word formation/structure), syntax (the patterns of sentences), and discourse (the context in which utterances are patterned and made meaningful). We will review both traditional and contemporary approaches to English grammar, such as cognitive grammar, construction grammar, lexico-grammar, pattern grammar, and systemic functional grammar. Through reading, research projects, and discussion, students will attain a solid understanding of the English language’s structure and usage. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.
Prerequisite(s): EN 320 or EN 321 or ANT 210 or ANT 401 or ANT 450 or FR 361 or IT 361 or SP 361

Directed Courses

EN 429-001/002: Directed Readings

Various Staff

Prerequisite: Enrollment only by previous arrangement with a specific instructor and with the permission of the director of undergraduate English studies.

EN 430-001/002/003: English Internship

Various Staff

An on- or off-campus training position in which students use the skills they have gained as English majors and enhance their employment opportunities after graduation. Interns work approximately 10 hours a week, holding responsible positions with, among others, Alabama Heritage, Alabama Alumni Magazine, and the Tuscaloosa Public Defender’s Office. Apply to the director of undergraduate studies in the Department of English. Please see the departmental website for the application form and further details.

EN 499: Honors Thesis

Various Staff

The Honors Thesis in English course is an individualized, directed readings class that culminates in a 30-50 pp. thesis. It is the final required course for the Honors in English program. Each student enrolled will work individually with a faculty mentor.
Prerequisite: EN 399.

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Spring 2019